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Low Vision

EyeEyesight depends on a complex series of interactions between the different parts of the eye. (Read about "The Eye") Many things can cause low vision and each one affects sight in a different way, according to the Low Vision Information Center (LVIC). Low vision affects some people as they age. Other causes according to LVIC are things such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, cataracts and glaucoma. (Read about "Macular Degeneration" "Diabetes" "Cataracts" "Glaucoma")

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) says low vision means you cannot fix your eyesight with glasses, contact lenses, medicine or surgery. It can get in the way of your normal daily routine. NIA offers these symptoms that may indicate you have low vision:

If you have any of these problems, ask your eye care professional to test you for low vision. There are many things that can help. Aids can help you read, write and manage daily living tasks. Lighting can be adjusted to your needs. You also can try prescription reading glasses, large-print reading materials, magnifying aids, closed-circuit televisions, audio tapes, electronic reading machines and computers that use large print and speech.

LVIC says that contrast is important if you have low vision. Simple changes also may help:

Although low vision cannot be corrected, changes can make it easier to function.

Related Information:

    Eye Exams

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By printing and/or reading this article, you agree that you accept all terms and conditions of use, as specified online.