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Burn Prevention

Burn PreventionAccording to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, fire is the second leading cause of accidental death in the American home. Each year, hundreds of thousands of fires are reported to local fire departments. The results can be devastating. Even more tragically, CPSC says many of these fires could have been avoided by following some precautions such as the following:

Cooking

Heating

Smoking

Children

A large proportion of burns in the United States occur to small children.

Smoke detectors

It's also important to use smoke detectors. Follow the manufacturer's instructions when installing a smoke detector and test the detector regularly to make sure the battery in your smoke detector is working properly.

If something happens

The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) says more than two million Americans suffer burn injuries each year, and about 70,000 of them require admission to the hospital.

If someone is burned, ACEP suggests for minor burns you run cool, not cold, water over the burn or hold a clean, cold compress on it until the pain subsides. Do not use butter or other types of grease. Do not use ice. Remove jewelry or tight clothing from around burned areas and apply a clean, dry dressing.

For more serious burns, call 911 for emergency assistance. Do not use water or break blisters. Do not remove clothing if it is stuck to the burned skin. Keep the victim warm and dry and keep burned arms or legs raised to reduce swelling. ACEP also says to get immediate medical attention for any of the following connected to a burn:

Above all, plan ahead. Discuss emergency plans with all family members so that if there is a fire or burn, everyone, even young children, knows what to do.

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All Concept Communications material is provided for information only and is neither advice nor a substitute for proper medical care. Consult a qualified healthcare professional who understands your particular history for individual concerns.

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By printing and/or reading this article, you agree that you accept all terms and conditions of use, as specified online.